What Happened To Technology Enabled Clothing (TEC) After Shark Tank?

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Are you a techy person who travels a lot? If you are, then you may know what it's like to carry around all of your gear in a bag—and then carry the bag itself.

Well, if so, we've got the perfect solution for you: TEC. TEC is a vest that was designed by Scott Jordan, and it can hold almost anything! From your cell phone to your tablet and digital camera, this vest has got you covered.

In this article, I'm going to break down what happened after Technology-Enabled Clothing’s appearance on Shark Tank and what we can expect next from this amazing entrepreneur!

Who is the founder of TEC?

Non-practicing attorney Scott Jordan has constructed a vast corporate empire

What Happened To Technology Enabled Clothing (TEC) After Shark Tank

Jordan's SCOTTeVEST apparel brand is what first brought attention to his SCOTTeVEST business.

TEC, which stands for "technology-enabled clothing," is a brand of garments with hidden pockets designed to keep your phone or other electronic equipment safe.

Features of TEC

This item may be added to any jacket or vest for easier carrying and a quicker checkpoint experience. You can stuff just about anything into the vest's pockets without making it seem or feel too big or off-center. 

Some of the pockets are even constructed from a material that lets you use your touchscreen smartphone without ever pulling it out. To avoid tangled wires, there is a designated spot for your headphones.

The pitching in Shark Tank

Jordan asked for $500,000 in return for 15% of Technology Enhanced Clothing when he went into the Shark Tank. 

Jordan then goes on to tell the Sharks that he is a "gadget person," or someone who is always equipped with various technological devices. 

Jordan constantly seems to be toting about a large amount of electronic gadgetry, whether cellular phones, tablet computers, or digital cameras. 

The first Shark to speak out is Robert Herjavec, who noticed an ad for a competing product while thumbing through a magazine. Jordan tells the Sharks he founded a retail company based on selling garments with built-in technological enhancements.

But Robert is very interested in how well these high-tech garments are selling over at ScottEvest. They've earned roughly $5.1 million so far and could finish the year with a profit of about $12 million.

Following Robert's presentation, however, Jordan makes it quite plain that he has zero plans to sell any portion of his retail operation. He sees a multibillion-dollar opportunity in licensing the intellectual property to other major apparel businesses.

The agitation of other Sharks with Jordan

What this does to Kevin O'Leary is shake his confidence. O'Leary says that Jordan is greedy since he isn't offering him a part of the company in exchange for the patent, while Jordan says that O'Leary is just being a selfish businessman.

Daymond said that he had seen comparable designs to TEC's built-in headphones on other garments.

He is curious as to what sets TEC apart to the point that it was granted a patent. Jordan goes on to say that he went to court because those companies were violating his patent and ultimately prevailed.

O'Leary is now fired up, and he tells Jordan he needs him because of what he's learned about suing people.

But he isn't pleased that he's just getting a small sample of the business. Jordan claims he doesn't need any assistance running his retail business, but he wants a greater cut of the action anyhow.

But then Mark Cuban changes the subject by asking what precisely Jordan has patented. It is then told to him that the patented invention is the method through which wires may be threaded through garments. 

Cuban loses his cool and goes on a rant about the absurdity of granting patents for such frivolous ideas and then suing them.

After learning that Jordan was a lawyer in the past, Cuban and John get very agitated, causing chaos to break out in the Shark Tank. Both of them find it unfair, but Herjavec intervenes to give him credit where credit is due. 

A good concept, a patent, and the ability to fight against infringement, according to him—all in quick succession.

Other Sharks say Jordan is a major hassle to deal with

However, Herjavec isn't interested in investing just in the patent; he also wants a piece of ScottEvest as a whole since he thinks it has the potential to become a billion-dollar business. 

Other Sharks say Jordan is a major hassle to deal with

Thus, he proposes. In addition to the patent, Herjavec is willing to give Jordan $500,000 in return for a 15% stake in the firm.

However, Jordan is offended by the offer and asks Herjavec if he is nuts for giving $500,000 to a firm that is bringing in $5,000,000 a year.

Jordan admits that all he cares about is using them for their money and business contacts.

This prompted Barbara Corcoran to observe that he must be a major hassle to deal with. Due to her lack of confidence in his suitability as a work partner, she has decided to withdraw from the program.

Similarly, Cuban opts not to put money into the company because he believes the cellular device market is where the industry is headed. 

He claims that he can develop a competing product for TEC, only one that uses BlueTooth technology rather than a vest designed for wired purposes.

It seems as if Jordan has turned off all of the Sharks with his harsh approach, but O'Leary can see why they may feel that way.

He agrees that Cuban makes a solid argument about cellular technology, but he also thinks Jordan is doing OK in expanding his present brand. He then chooses to match Herjavec's offer, giving Jordan the option to choose between himself and Herjavec.

No deal happened

For a moment, Jordan leaves the tank to talk to Steve Wozniak, another part of his advisory committee and the creator of Apple.

Over the phone, he describes the offers and seeks advice on what to do next. When he gets back to the Shark Tank, he explains that he was told the offer was too low for a company of his company's caliber.

After that, tensions rise again between Jordan and the Sharks due to his open contempt for them.

Finally, Jordan indicates to both O'Leary and Herjavec that they are no longer needed and that they may go. John is upset that he wasted their time, but he leaves without saying sorry.

Technology-Enabled Clothing (TEC) after Shark Tank

After the show aired, further conflict arose. Taking to Twitter, Mark Cuban made it quite obvious that, in his opinion, Jordan was a "patent troll" and that he had actively pushed Aye Gear, a knockoff of ScottEvest. 

Additionally, they engaged in a heated debate on podcasts and blogs, with listeners and readers choosing sides.

Despite that, it seems the business is thriving. After appearing on Shark Tank, their sales increased by 200% in only one year. An infringement case was also brought against Aye Gear.

Expanding the product features of TEC

A new TEC jacket with built-in speakers in the collar, removable sleeves, and solar panels on the shoulders for on-the-go charging was introduced not long after. You may still purchase coats from them in the year 2022. 

Technology-Enabled-Clothing-TEC-Before-Shark-Tank-1024x518

They've greatly increased the scope of their offerings. They now also sell the pocketed Tropiformer Jacket, the pocketed Tropiformer 3D Jacket, the pocketed EDC Jacket, and the pocketed Revolution Plus 2.0 Jacket.

All 26 of your storage needs may be met with the Revolution Plus 2.0 Jacket's 26-pocket design and 100% polyester construction.

For instance, the Revolution Plus 2.0 Jacket has detachable sleeves and pockets large enough to hold up to a 12.9-inch iPad. 

The hood may be taken off, too. Priced at $379, it comes in six different sizes (S, M, L, XL, XXL, and XXXL).

Many of their vests, tees, hoodies, windbreakers, and button-down shirts include pockets in addition to their coats. And that's not all; they also have a line tailored to ladies with the same basic offerings. 

The Daisy Dress, a women-only item with eight pockets that costs $119, is just one example. It also sells hats, masks, and other headwear as an accessory.

Among the women's apparel they provide are dresses, skirts, and skorts.

They sell items with price tags ranging from $29 to $300 or more. In the end, everything boils down to the deal you strike. Their coats, for instance, will cost more than their shirts and cardigans. 

You may find discounts, though, at the outlet area of their website. At the time of writing, the women's apparel they provide are dresses, skirts, and skorts. Their Veronica V-Neck Tees were marked down from $50 to $14.99.

However, Jordan's exuberant personality remains the same. After calling Fox News viewers "fucking idiots," he was ultimately forced to leave as CEO in 2017.

In 2019, after borrowing $2 million from the bank for TV advertisements, he reclaimed control of the company.

They still make millions of dollars per year, despite sales dropping by half during the Covid-19 outbreak. As of the year 2022, Jordan is expected to have amassed a net worth of $65 million.

Technology-Enabled Clothing (TEC) pricing

The pricing of their product varies by category, the  Revolution Plus 2.0 Jacket price is $379 dollars. Their  Daisy Dress, a women-only item with eight pockets costs $119 dollars.  

The women's apparel includes dresses, skirts, and skorts items with price tags ranging from $29 to $300 or more.  Their Veronica V-Neck Tees were marked down from $50 to $14.99.

Technology-Enabled Clothing (TEC) pros & cons

Technology-Enabled Clothing (TEC) is a growing trend in the fashion industry, and it's not hard to see why. Technology can make your clothes better in so many ways. 

However, there are some downsides to TEC as well, always take a look at both sides of the coin so you know what you're getting into before you invest in TEC clothing.

Pros

  • Fashionable
  • TEC allows people to secure their phones or other portable electronic devices. This will be particularly useful if they're worried about losing their phone or having it stolen while they're out in public.
  • TEC can allow for more efficient transportation and even quicker passage through airport security. If travelers want to get through security faster or need to check their bags and get on their flight without waiting around for hours on end then TEC will definitely come in handy here! 

Cons

  • TEC could be used to track your movements.
  • TEC can be hacked and used against you in ways that you didn't foresee.
  • It”s expensive.

Technology-Enabled Clothing (TEC) alternatives

Technology Enabled Clothing, or TEC, is a collection of inside pockets created primarily to secure a person's phone or another portable electronic device. 

Technology-Enabled Clothing (TEC) alternatives

This unique technology is now solely employed in Jordan's retail business, but what he really wants to do is license the invention to other well-known outwear manufacturers

He is reasonably optimistic that his new innovation will be a success because his ScottEvests are already well-known among technology enthusiasts. 

However, he requires the assistance of someone with the necessary contacts in order to obtain the licensing arrangement he desires.

So he decides to take TEC to the Shark Tank in the hopes of striking a deal with one of the well-known businessmen and women.

Conclusion

Did Technology-enabled clothing become a household name? Did these wearable tech clothes make their way into your closet?

Well… not exactly. But not because they were terrible products! In fact, most of them were quite good—it's just that people weren't ready for them yet.

I think that wearable tech clothing will be big someday soon—but right now we're still waiting on some key pieces that will make this type of clothing more user-friendly and appealing: better battery life, smaller form factors, and more.

About the author 

Peter Keszegh

Most people write this part in the third person but I won't. You're at the right place if you want to start or grow your online business. When I'm not busy scaling up my own or other people' businesses, you'll find me trying out new things and discovering new places. Connect with me on Facebook, just let me know how I can help.

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